Heinrich Sperling 1844-1924

 

Reuben Ward Binks. 1880-1950

 

Reuben Ward Binks. 1880-1950
Louis William Wain. 1860 -1939

Wain was born on 5th August 1860. His father was a traveller for a textile firm: his mother, of French emigre descent, designed church embroideries and carpets. He studied at the West London School of Art, and began his career as an art journalist, drawing many different subjects. However, it was for his pictures of cats that he eventually became famous. From the 1880’s until the outbreak of the first world war, the ‘Louis Wain cat’ was hugely popular. Appearing in vast quantities in prints, books, magazines, postcards and annuals, Wain’s cats are to be found engaging in every form of human activity – from playing cricket, digging up roads, and riding bicycles, to parading the latest fashions at Ascot and making pompous after-dinner speeches at the club.

Despite his fame Wain never made much money, being highly impractical in business matters, and during the war he began to suffer real poverty. Always known as being somewhat eccentric, he now began to develop signs of serious mental disorder. Previously a mild and gentle man, he became increasingly suspicious, abusive and occasionally even violent towards his sisters with whom he lived
Eventually in June 1924, he was certified insane and committed to Springfield Hospital (the former Surrey County Asylum) at Tooting. ‘Discovered’ here the following year, he was transferred to Bethlem Hospital after a campaign by admirers of his work, including the Prime Minister Ramsey Macdonald. (Macdonald later arranged for the Wain sisters to receive a small Civil List pension in recognition of their brother’s services to popular art.)

In 1930 Louis Wain was transferred to Napsbury Hospital, near St. Albans. He continued drawing until near the end of his life, and exhibitions of his work were held in London in 1931 and 1937, as well as a memorial exhibition shortly after his death. He died at Napsbury on 4th July 1939.

A beautiful watercolour of a dog. Signed by the artist twice and inscribed “Beg For It” – the dog has a sugar lump resting on his nose! Wain is best known for his cat watercolours but also often painted dogs. This piece is a good size and in very nice condition with fresh colours – still on its original paper and not laid down.measures 13 x 11 inches

Louis William Wain 1860 – 1939

Wain was born on 5th August 1860. His father was a traveller for a textile firm: his mother, of French emigre descent, designed church embroideries and carpets. He studied at the West London School of Art, and began his career as an art journalist, drawing many different subjects. However, it was for his pictures of cats that he eventually became famous. From the 1880’s until the outbreak of the first world war, the ‘Louis Wain cat’ was hugely popular. Appearing in vast quantities in prints, books, magazines, postcards and annuals, Wain’s cats are to be found engaging in every form of human activity – from playing cricket, digging up roads, and riding bicycles, to parading the latest fashions at Ascot and making pompous after-dinner speeches at the club.

Despite his fame Wain never made much money, being highly impractical in business matters, and during the war he began to suffer real poverty. Always known as being somewhat eccentric, he now began to develop signs of serious mental disorder. Previously a mild and gentle man, he became increasingly suspicious, abusive and occasionally even violent towards his sisters with whom he lived
Eventually in June 1924, he was certified insane and committed to Springfield Hospital (the former Surrey County Asylum) at Tooting. ‘Discovered’ here the following year, he was transferred to Bethlem Hospital after a campaign by admirers of his work, including the Prime Minister Ramsey Macdonald. (Macdonald later arranged for the Wain sisters to receive a small Civil List pension in recognition of their brother’s services to popular art.)

In 1930 Louis Wain was transferred to Napsbury Hospital, near St. Albans. He continued drawing until near the end of his life, and exhibitions of his work were held in London in 1931 and 1937, as well as a memorial exhibition shortly after his death. He died at Napsbury on 4th July 1939.

A sepia watercolor of four Hounds, painted as a special commission, circa 1930, signed lower left, 23 by 18cm.
7×9 inches.

Lionel Edwards 1878 –1966

Lionel Edwards, A British artist who specialized in painting horses and other aspects of British country life. He is best known for his hunting scenes but also painted pictures of horse racing, shooting and fishing. He provided illustrations for Country Life, The Sphere, The Graphic and numerous books.

The son of a doctor, Edwards grew up at Benarth, a small estate in Conway, North Wales. His father, from whom he acquired his love of fox hunting, died when he was seven. From an early age, he showed a talent for drawing horses, an artistic trait which may have come from his maternal grandmother, who was a pupil of George Romney. It seemed he was heading for an Army career until it became apparent that his talents did not lie in that direction so his mother allowed him to study art in London, first with A.S. Cope and later at the Heatherley School of Fine Art and Frank Calderon’s School of Animal Painting.

He became the youngest member of the London Sketch Club at the age of nineteen. In 1905, he married Ethel Wells and the couple moved out of London to Radley, in Oxfordshire, and later to Worcestershire, before moving back to Benarth. They both were enthusiastic fox hunters: during his life, Edwards hunted with almost every pack in the country.

On the outbreak of the Great War, he volunteered as a Remount Purchasing Officer along with his contemporaries, Cecil Aldin and Sir Alfred Munnings. On being demobilized, he and his family moved to West Tytherley, near Salisbury, where he lived for the rest of his life.

His artistic output was remarkable: he wrote almost 30 books and illustrated many more, including editions of Black Beauty, Lorna Doone and The Black Arrow, in addition to numerous private commissions. He became a member of the Royal Cambrian Academy of Art in 1926 and the Royal Institute in 1927. His favorite medium was watercolours although he used oils more in his later years. He worked to the end of his life, dying from a stroke at his home on 13 April 1966.

John Sanderson Wells 1872

1955.John Sanderson Wells was a London artist who specialised in sporting and animal painting. He studied at the Slade School of Art in London, and later at the Academie Julian in Paris. From 1895 he was a regular contributor at the Royal Academy and was elected to the Royal Institute in 1903.

Much of Wells’ work was privately commissioned. These subjects were mainly hunting subjects – including one for the Duke of Beaufort. Wells painted in a naturalistic style, his painting is technically very well executed and a feeling of graceful movement is evident in his compositions.

His work is in many important private collections, and is highly sought after. He died on 16th March 1955.

Falling at the brook. Watercolour. 30 x 50cm.

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